Sunday October 20, 2019

October 2018 News

September News November News

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Chinese, American Warships Nearly Collide Near Spratly Islands
Vice President Mike Pence Gives Speech on China
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Meets with Chinese Officials in Beijing
U.S. Officials Condemn China’s Repression of Minorities
Chinese Intel Officer Extradited to U.S.
U.S. Restricts Export of Nuclear Technology to China
American, Chinese Defense Leaders Meet in Singapore
U.S. Government Blocks Tech Sales to Another Chinese Company

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Chinese, American Warships Nearly Collide Near Spratly Islands

On October 1, a Chinese Luyang-class destroyer nearly collided with the USS Decatur while the American ship conducted freedom of navigation exercises. The Chinese destroyer came within 45 yards of the American ship and forced it to make evasive maneuvers to avoid collision. China’s Foreign Ministry condemned the exercise and accused the U.S. of making “provocative” operations.

This is only the latest sign of tension involving the U.S. and China’s militaries. On September 30, American officials announced a mid-October meeting between Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and senior Chinese military officials was cancelled by China.

The U.S. Navy is reportedly drafting a plan to conduct freedom of navigation exercises through the South China Sea and the Strait of Taiwan in November.

Read More:

CNN ­- Chinese warship in ‘unsafe’ encounter with US destroyer, amid rising US-China tensions
Business InsiderThe US military is planning a serious showdown with China that would be a significant show of force on tense tides and involve American warships and aircraft
ReutersChina condemns U.S. for South China Sea freedom of navigation operation
New York Times
China Cancels High-Level Security Talks With the U.S.
South China Morning PostPentagon: US warship sails near South China Sea area claimed by Beijing

 


 

Vice President Mike Pence Gives Speech on China

On October 4, at the Hudson Institute, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence gave a speech accusing the Chinese government of interfering with the domestic policy and politics of the U.S., of encouraging the theft of American intellectual property. The Vice President condemned China’s military aggression in the South China Sea, China’s oppressive domestic policies, and it’s “debt diplomacy” abroad.

Reactions to this speech were mixed. Some analysts and commentators compared this to Winston Churchill’s famous “Iron Curtain” speech, which heralded the Cold War. Others were less concerned, as they viewed this as a political stunt to engage Republican supporters prior to the midterm elections in November.

White HouseRemarks by Vice President Pence on the Administration’s Policy Toward China

Read More:

Bloomberg – Pence Casts China as Republican Campaign Foe in Harsh Speech
The Diplomat –
3 Types of Chinese Reactions to Mike Pence’s China Speech
New York Times
Pence’s China Speech Seen as Portent of ‘New Cold War’
NPRVice President Pence Accuses China Of Trying To Interfere In U.S. Elections
Washington PostPence says China is trying to undermine Trump because it ‘wants a different American president’

 


 

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Meets with Chinese Officials in Beijing

On October 8, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and Yang Jiechi, director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office. Pompeo was in Beijing to discuss his recent meeting with North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un. The meeting in Beijing was tense.

Wang publically accused the U.S. of damaging mutual trust by escalating the trade war and meddling in China’s domestic concerns. In particular, Wang condemned U.S. military cooperation and arm sales with Taiwan. Pompeo said the two countries have “fundamental disagreements.” However, Wang acknowledged that the issue of North Korean denuclearization was important and that the two side should maintain a unified approach, despite tensions in other areas of the U.S.-China relationship.

Read More:

BloombergChina-U.S. Tensions Flare in Testy Pompeo Visit to Beijing
ReutersChill in the air as Pompeo meets Chinese counterparts in Beijing
South China Morning PostUS Secretary Pompeo’s China visit marked by frosty talks and ‘fundamental disagreement’
Washington PostChina tells Trump administration to stop its ‘misguided’ actions and allegations

 


 

U.S. Officials Condemn China’s Repression of Minorities

On October 10, the Congressional-Executive Commission on China released their annual report on human rights in China. The commission chairs, Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Congressman Chris Smith (R-NJ) called for a stronger U.S. response to the repression of Muslim communities in China, particularly that of the Uyghurs, a Muslim minority largely based in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The plight of the Uyghurs was also touched on by Vice President Mike Pence in his October 4 speech.

Senator Rubio and Congressman Smith released a bill that would condemn Chinese repression in Xinjiang. The chairs also encouraged the U.S. government consider sanctioning Chinese leaders and sent a letter to the FBI asking the agency to investigate claims that the Chinese government has been intimidating and influencing Chinese immigrant communities in the U.S.

The Chinese government only recently confirmed the presence of  re-education camps in Xinjiang, having previously denied their existence flat out. On October 10, the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region legalized “vocational skill education training center.” Officials in China have framed the camps as providing vital education and job training to combat poverty and religious extremism. First person accounts and satellite images reveal a different picture. Some former residents of the “grueling” facilities describe conditions and tactics intended to remove all sense of ethnic and religious identity. There is no official figure for the number of people in these facilities, but many scholars and analysts estimate between tens of thousands and one million are being held.

Congressional-Executive Commission on ChinaChairs Release 2018 Annual Report

Read More:

BBC – Xinjiang top official defends Uighur ‘internment camps’
CNN –
China’s paranoia and oppression in Xinjiang has a long history
New York TimesChina Breaks Silence on Muslim Detention Camps, Calling Them ‘Humane’
South China Morning Post China changes law to recognise ‘re-education camps’ in Xinjiang
Washington Post – U. S. lawmakers urge FBI to probe claims of Chinese intimidation against immigrants

 


 

Chinese Intel Officer Extradited to U.S.

On October 10, the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed charges relating to the extradition of Yanjun Xu, alleged Chinese Intelligence Officer. Xu was arrested in Belgium earlier in the year and extradited to the U.S. on October 9. As early as 2013, Xu allegedly targeted employees at aviation and aerospace companies, including GE Aviation, to obtain proprietary information. The federal trial will be held in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Read More:

Business Insider – China says accusations against alleged spy ‘out of thin air’
New York Times
Chinese Officer Is Extradited to U.S. to Face Charges of Economic Espionage
NPR U.S. Charges Alleged Chinese Government Spy With Stealing U.S. Trade Secrets
South China Morning PostChinese spy caught in ‘rare’ sting after ‘plot to steal US trade secrets’

 


 

U.S. Restricts Export of Nuclear Technology to China

On October 11, the U.S. Department of Energy announced increased restrictions on civilian nuclear technology exports to China. The new regulations will not end the export of nuclear technology, but will restrict technology that would allow China to further develop their militarized use of nuclear power. In particular, the state-owned China General Nuclear Power Corp. will not be allowed access to U.S. nuclear technology.

Department of EnergyDOE Announces Measures to Prevent China’s Illegal Diversion of U.S. Civil Nuclear Technology for Military or Other Unauthorized Purposes

Read More:

New York TimesU.S. Puts New Restrictions on Nuclear Technology Exports to China
South China Morning PostUS curbs China nuclear exports as Trump warns that Americans are not ‘stupid’

 


 

American, Chinese Defense Leaders Meet in Singapore

On October 18, U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Chinese Defense Minister Wei Fenghe met on the sidelines of an ASEAN forum in Singapore. The two were previously supposed to meet in Beijing later this month, but the meeting was cancelled after the U.S. imposed sanctions on the Chinese military for purchasing military hardware from Russia. The Chinese government reportedly requested the meeting in Singapore.

Secretary Mattis advocated for continued dialogue between the American and Chinese militaries. He also extended another invitation to Minister Wei to visit the U.S. No public statements were issued following the meeting.

Read More:

CNN – Mattis and his Chinese counterpart to meet following canceled talks
New York Times
Jim Mattis, Meeting His Chinese Counterpart, Tries to Ease Tensions
Reuters – As tensions mount, Mattis seeks more resilient U.S. ties with China’s military
South China Morning Post –
China, US defence chiefs meet on sidelines of Asean meeting in Singapore

 


 

U.S. Government Blocks Tech Sales to Another Chinese Company

On October 29, the U.S. Commerce Department announced restrictions on exports to Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Company, Ltd. (Jinhua) due to concerns for U.S. national security. In May 2018, ZTE was hit with a similar ban, which was eventually removed. However, trade relations between the U.S. and China have worsened significantly since then and a similar agreement seems unlikely. Jinhua, like ZTE, relies on foreign-made technology for its production of semiconductors.

U.S. Department of CommerceAddition of Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Company, Ltd (Jinhua) to the Entity List

Read More:

BBC – US targets Chinese firm over national security fears
CNN –
US strikes at the heart of China’s tech ambitions with chipmaker ban
New York Times
U.S. to Block Sales to Chinese Tech Company Over Security Concerns

 

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Page Updated: October 31
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