Wednesday October 23, 2019

July 2019 News

June 2019 News | August 2019 News

President Trump Relaxes Huawei Ban

Mass Exit of Companies from China due to Raging Trade War

US Warship Sails through Taiwan Strait

China Sentences Online Activist Huang Qi to 12 Years in Prison

President Trump Relaxes Huawei Ban

This past weekend’s G20 Summit meeting between President Xi and President Trump has ended in a trade truce and, surprisingly, a relaxation of the Huawei ban, just over a month after the Commerce Department blacklisted the company due to national security concerns. Huawei will now be allowed to purchase some U.S. commercial products, although the White House’s top economic advisor, Larry Kudlow, assured that “Huawei will remain on the so-called entity list where there are serious export controls and in national security inferences or suggestions there won’t be any licenses.”

In addition, President Trump decided to hold off on imposing an additional $300 billion in tariffs and the two governments have committed to resuming negotiations. President Trump claimed that President Xi promised to buy “tremendous” amounts of U.S. agricultural products, but Chinese official media has yet to confirm this statement.

Read More:

Asia Times – Road of US-China relations remains bumpy after Huawei reprieve
Engadget Trump to lift some restrictions on Huawei as part of China truce
South China Morning Post –
As it happened: Donald Trump confirms US companies can continue to sell to Huawei during G20 press conference

 

Mass Exit of Companies from China due to Raging Trade War

As Trump’s trade war continues, more than 50 global companies  have begun or are planning to pull production out of China. Some of these companies include Apple, who is considering moving 15% to 30% of iPhone production out of China, Nintendo, Sketchers, and Dell. Foreign companies are not the only ones considering making a move, however. Some Chinese companies, such as TCL, are shifting production as well.

The majority of these shifts are directed towards Southeast Asia. Vietnam is especially attractive to companies that produce electrical and electronic equipment. Vietnam has been a major beneficiary of the current trade war.

In response to this exodus, China is attempting to incentivize companies to remain in China. In particular, China has been relaxing restrictions on foreign direct investment and is planning to open up the country’s financial sector.

Read More:

CNBC- More than 50 companies reportedly pull production out of China due to trade war Money and Markets – CEOs Pulling Supply Chains Out of China as Trump Tariffs Weigh

 

US Warship Sails through Taiwan Strait

On Thursday, July 25, the USS Antietam, a naval warship, sailed through the Taiwan Strait. The passage followed a statement released by the Chinese government on Wednesday, July 24, stating that China is willing to use force to prevent Taiwan from moving toward formal independence.

Cdr. Clay Doss, spokesman for the US Navy’s Seventh Fleet, claimed that the transit was carried out in accordance with international law. He also stated, “The ship’s transit through the Taiwan Strait demonstrates the US commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific. […] The US Navy will continue to fly, sail and operate anywhere international law allows.”

Hua Chunying, the spokeswoman for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, responded to the passage by urging the US “to be prudent and act appropriately with regards to Taiwan so that it doesn’t harm China-US relations and the peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait’s region.”

Taiwan is a major point of tension in the US-China relationship. In the defense white paper Beijing released on Wednesday, the Chinese government chastised America’s involvement in the Taiwan issue, including selling arms to Taiwan. Earlier this month, the US approved a $2.2 billion arms sale to Taiwan, a move that further increased tension between the US and China.

Read More:

CNN – US Navy sails warship through contested waterway as Beijing warns Taiwan 
Al Jazeera – US warship sails through strategic Taiwan Strait

 

China Sentences Online Activist Huang Qi to 12 Years in Prison

Huang Qi, who is known as China’s first ‘cyber-dissident,’ has been sentenced to 12 years  in prison on charges of leaking state secrets. ‘State secrets,’ in this case, refer to his reporting on human rights abuses in China. Since 1997, Huang Qi has run a website known as 64 Tianwang which reports on abuses carried out by Chinese officials.

Huang Qi has been imprisoned multiple times in the past. He was imprisoned in 2000 for inciting state subversion, and again in 2009 for his reporting on the Sichuan earthquake that killed 87,000 people and raised suspicions over the construction quality and safety of the buildings in the area.

Now 56 years old and in poor health, international human rights organizations are campaigning for his release. His mother, Pu Wenqing, is a key figure in this campaign, but has recently been detained in her own home by Chinese officials. Frances Eve, deputy director of research at Chinese Human Rights Defenders, claimed  that Qi’s sentence was essentially a “death sentence” due to his poor physical condition.

Read More:

BBC- China jails award-winning cyber dissident Huang Qi 

Page Updated: July 29, 2019 Top of Page