Tuesday September 25, 2018

 

 

The USCPF released the most recent edition of the Washington Journal of Modern China (volume 14) in Spring 2018.
Featured articles include the following:


Spring 2018 front and back cover-2SPECIAL ISSUE SECTION

“Reflections on 90 Years of Cultural Exchanges: the Library of Congress’ Chinese Section”
Chi Wang, PhD

“The Chinese Section’s History in Photos”
From the Private Collection of Chi Wang

“Remembering the 90th Anniversary of the Chinese Section”
Remarks by Dr. Jim Cheng

 

ARTICLES

“The United States and China: Game of Superpowers”
Ambassador Chas W. Freeman, Jr.

“Cracking the China Conundrum”
Yukon Huang, PhD

“Will China Rise?”*
Jack Goldstone, PhD

“Manning Taiwan’s Military: Reflections On the 2000 Defense Reorganization Acts”
Bernard Cole, PhD

“Understanding and Responding to China’s Belt and Road Initiative: Developing an American Policy Response”
Jordan Bushong, Katelyn DeNap, and Tracie Yang

 

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The Washington Journal of Modern China is an annual scholarly publication of the U.S.-China Policy Foundation. The emphasis of the Washington Journal of Modern China is contemporary Chinese affairs, including scholarly articles on politics, economics, military, and environment. The Journal also features less formal material such as the transcripts from discussions and roundtable events, travel observations, and, as before, book reviews.

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Article Guidelines

Comprehensive Index of Past WJMC Articles

Online Versions of Past WJMC Editions

SUBSCRIBE TO WJMC

  • Subscriptions for individuals: $30.00 per year (plus $5.00 S&H)
  • Subscriptions for institutions: $40.00 per year (plus $5.00 S&H)
  • Sample issues: $14.00 each (plus $5.00 S&H)

 

For subscriptions, please contact the USCPF via email at wjmc@uscpf.org.
Manuscript submissions are welcomed for consideration.

*CORRECTION: Page 68, 2nd paragraph, last line – “problematic loans, which are now by one estimate over $3 trillion U.S., or well over 200 percent of Chinese GDP.” Problematic loans make up 20 percent of Chinese GDP, not 200 percent.